I try to reblog and share more than I post of my own. I do about a 40/60 split between my content and the content I share of others.

Tumblr Guru’s Best Practices Revealed

In an awesome and transparent move, Tumblr Yoda Anthony De Rosa made his Social Media Cheat Sheet publicly available yesterday via Google Docs. The Cheat Sheet, which can be edited by anyone with the link, contains best practices for Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr (in that order).

I found one of the Tumblr tips, which I quote above, to be especially interesting. De Rosa says he reblogs more than he posts his own content- putting the reblog to original content ratio at 60/40. To date, I’ve posted 95 times over 20 months and, of those, only seven are reblogs. 

The reason for such limited reblogging is that I’ve worked hard to maintain the quality of this blog. I don’t post everything that comes to mind and until recently, tried to limit postings to kick ass original photographyconcert reviewsarticle recommendations and a few observations

Lately, I’ve changed my tune. While still very serious about quality, I’ve incorporated a few major changes. First, I started writing about current events and have even had some of my analysis featured in cool places such as Media Gazer

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And, I’m warming to reblogging. Of the seven reblogs I mentioned above, three of them happened in March, and we’re only halfway through. I really like the way reblogs have turned Tumblr into more of a place for conversation and less a place for me to spit out content. For the time being, I’m primarily reblogging posts where I can add additional insight, but that may change. 

It wasn’t easy to to change the way I use Tumblr, but I think the changes are good, necessary even. They’ve made this space more relevant and allow me to engage more fully with the (stellar) Tumblr community.

I must admit, I was a bit shocked to see the 60/40 ratio that De Rosa recommends. The idea of posting more content developed by other people than myself on MY blog gives me the willies. But, sharing and community are part of what makes Tumblr great and my recent forays into the world of reblogging have shown me at least this much. I may never get to 60/40, but I’ll be working towards it, trying to bring you a mixture of top notch content created by both me and others. Onward!

Related: Meet The Journalist Behind Tumblr’s Rise | De Rosa’s Cheat Sheet

What BuzzFeed Is Trying to Do
Earlier this month, BuzzFeed shocked the media world by hiring Politico’s Ben Smith as its editor in chief. Smith, recruited hard by BuzzFeed founder Jonah Peretti, was a star Politico columnist and figured to have an important role in Politico’s 2012 election coverage.
Many questions arose when Smith decided to move from a well respected newsroom to a site known mostly for its knack for finding cute animal videos and other ‘buzz worthy’ internet stuff. “Why did he do it?” the media asked. Or how could he? “Is this a good fit for you?” asked a baffled Howard Kurtz.
For me, the most interesting question about  Smith’s move is what will the new BuzzFeed look like? Today, I think we have a better clue. One of Smith’s new hires, Andrew Kaczynski, began contributing two days ago and already has video up with the potential to make some waves in the race for the Republican nomination.
The video, dug up by Kaczynski  features Ron Paul promoting his now controversial newsletters in a 1995 interview. The newsletters contain enough racial vitriol to sink a state assembly campaign and have been repeatedly dismissed by Paul as something so inconsequential that he would not even look at the content before the newsletter was sent out. The video seems to point otherwise, or at least seed doubt into Paul’s claims.
And there it is, news reporting from BuzzFeed that is both potentially viral and politically meaningful. There’s an added element here too- the potential to make news and not just report it. That’s a style that fits perfectly with BuzzFeed but would be a tough sell at Politico, which is focused on reporting harder news stories.
Perhaps this is the space that BuzzFeed pitched Smith on when convincing him there was an opportunity there. If Smith’s team continues to focus in on this type of content, there’s no doubt in my mind they will have more than one major breakthrough in the 2012 political season. This could be fun to watch.

What BuzzFeed Is Trying to Do

Earlier this month, BuzzFeed shocked the media world by hiring Politico’s Ben Smith as its editor in chief. Smith, recruited hard by BuzzFeed founder Jonah Peretti, was a star Politico columnist and figured to have an important role in Politico’s 2012 election coverage.

Many questions arose when Smith decided to move from a well respected newsroom to a site known mostly for its knack for finding cute animal videos and other ‘buzz worthy’ internet stuff. “Why did he do it?” the media asked. Or how could he? “Is this a good fit for you?” asked a baffled Howard Kurtz.

For me, the most interesting question about  Smith’s move is what will the new BuzzFeed look like? Today, I think we have a better clue. One of Smith’s new hires, Andrew Kaczynski, began contributing two days ago and already has video up with the potential to make some waves in the race for the Republican nomination.

The video, dug up by Kaczynski  features Ron Paul promoting his now controversial newsletters in a 1995 interview. The newsletters contain enough racial vitriol to sink a state assembly campaign and have been repeatedly dismissed by Paul as something so inconsequential that he would not even look at the content before the newsletter was sent out. The video seems to point otherwise, or at least seed doubt into Paul’s claims.

And there it is, news reporting from BuzzFeed that is both potentially viral and politically meaningful. There’s an added element here too- the potential to make news and not just report it. That’s a style that fits perfectly with BuzzFeed but would be a tough sell at Politico, which is focused on reporting harder news stories.

Perhaps this is the space that BuzzFeed pitched Smith on when convincing him there was an opportunity there. If Smith’s team continues to focus in on this type of content, there’s no doubt in my mind they will have more than one major breakthrough in the 2012 political season. This could be fun to watch.