meredithmo

Sad to hear about this.

I did some work for The Local Fort Greene/Clinton Hill in 2009. It was a great reentry into journalism just one year after I wrote this column: The End Of My Journalism Career

The highlight of my time at The Local was the interview I did with Spike Lee’s father, Bill, on his stoop in Fort Greene. The stoop would later be featured in Spike’s design of the Absolut Brooklyn bottle: 

image

I guess this means the Times never found a way to make the hyperlocal space profitable. Understandable, but disappointing. 

Hyperlocal, I believe, needs to move away from an ad-centric model and become an online outlet for local goods. To me, that’s the way it finds profitability amongst all the noise out there.

Perhaps now that these two blogs will separate from the Times’ control, they’ll be able to explore that path. 

I return to New Orleans often — to fish, eat and dance. But it is a particular pleasure to sit in one of the city’s many coffee shops and watch plain old folks jaw over The Times-Picayune, brandishing it like a weapon when they want to make a point.

When The Levee Breaks

David Carr writes a superb piece looking at the decline of the New Orleans Times-Picayune in his latest Media Equation column. The above is not the only memorable paragraph from the piece but it struck a resounding note when I read it. 

I visited New Orleans for a week in the spring of 2007 to participate in the Katrina relief effort. While there, I had the chance to hear from Dan Shea, the Times-Picayune’s managing editor. Shea spoke at length about the paper’s experience in the aftermath of the hurricane. Much of its staff stayed behind and, despite the widespread destruction, the paper only missed three days of print publication. It’s an amazing story of newsroom heroism by a staff that will soon be dramatically reduced.

Carr’s article is worth a read, if not just for the great writing. For the full article, check out The New York Times’ website

Mariano Rivera Walks Off A Hero
I’m shocked at the news that Mariano Rivera’s career is likely done, but also glad I got one last chance to see him pitch. I was at the game this past Monday night, a game that will likely go down as the last one Rivera ever plays in.
Rivera is the type of player that even a lifelong Mets fan, like myself, can appreciate, and even root for. He is classy, carries little ego and is about as good a ballplayer as the game has ever seen.
On Monday, my friends and I got to Yankee Stadium in time for the first pitch, but decided to grab a few beers at a local bar before heading into the stadium. By the time we took our seats, it was 2-1 Yankees, and so the score remained until the final out.
You would think that missing all the scoring in a ballgame could be considered a disappointment, but it was anything but. Rivera was the real attraction, everything else (yes, even Derek Jeter) was just extra. 
In assessing the aftermath of the Rivera injury, New York Times Columnist Tyler Kepner keenly observed the poetic significance of the spot where Rivera took his fall. Kepner writes:

If this is really it, and that sickening fall at the Kansas City warning track is the final image of Rivera in uniform, take a close look at the words on the billboard he tumbles into. It is a Budweiser ad, but for some reason the tagline says, “Walk Off a Hero.”

Just for the record, Rivera faced three batters on Monday and successfully saved the game in eight pitches.
"Walk Off a Hero." Yeah, that about says it all.
h/t @EitanNovick

Mariano Rivera Walks Off A Hero

I’m shocked at the news that Mariano Rivera’s career is likely done, but also glad I got one last chance to see him pitch. I was at the game this past Monday night, a game that will likely go down as the last one Rivera ever plays in.

Rivera is the type of player that even a lifelong Mets fan, like myself, can appreciate, and even root for. He is classy, carries little ego and is about as good a ballplayer as the game has ever seen.

On Monday, my friends and I got to Yankee Stadium in time for the first pitch, but decided to grab a few beers at a local bar before heading into the stadium. By the time we took our seats, it was 2-1 Yankees, and so the score remained until the final out.

You would think that missing all the scoring in a ballgame could be considered a disappointment, but it was anything but. Rivera was the real attraction, everything else (yes, even Derek Jeter) was just extra. 

In assessing the aftermath of the Rivera injury, New York Times Columnist Tyler Kepner keenly observed the poetic significance of the spot where Rivera took his fall. Kepner writes:

If this is really it, and that sickening fall at the Kansas City warning track is the final image of Rivera in uniform, take a close look at the words on the billboard he tumbles into. It is a Budweiser ad, but for some reason the tagline says, “Walk Off a Hero.”

Just for the record, Rivera faced three batters on Monday and successfully saved the game in eight pitches.

"Walk Off a Hero." Yeah, that about says it all.

h/t @EitanNovick

New York Times Paywall #Fail
Here’s a problem that comes along with having a team filled with uber-talented graphic artists: when you’re trying to convey something negative, it may just come across as downright cheery. Such is the case with The New York Times’ latest “oops, you hit the paywall” graphic. The mixture of fonts and color feels more “Be excited for this special offer” and less “Sorry bud, we’re not allowing you in the club.” I get that the Times wants people to be excited about their content, and heck, they should be. But I think the message and the reality here are just too disconnected to pull it off smoothly. 

New York Times Paywall #Fail

Here’s a problem that comes along with having a team filled with uber-talented graphic artists: when you’re trying to convey something negative, it may just come across as downright cheery. Such is the case with The New York Times’ latest “oops, you hit the paywall” graphic. The mixture of fonts and color feels more “Be excited for this special offer” and less “Sorry bud, we’re not allowing you in the club.” I get that the Times wants people to be excited about their content, and heck, they should be. But I think the message and the reality here are just too disconnected to pull it off smoothly. 

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — As John Conner plunged into the end zone for the Jets’ third touchdown of the second half, Mark Sanchez stood at the Buffalo 5-yard line and turned toward the crowd, or what was left of it, sitting behind the east end zone. He lifted his left leg and sliced the air with a Karate Kid-style drop kick, symbolically booting aside the Bills in an A.F.C. East race that tightened Sunday with an unequivocal demolition at Ralph Wilson Stadium.

'Lede'ing Off

The New York Times’ Greg Bishop sure knows how to start off a story. The above paragraph is simply a magnificent display of lede writing. Bishop’s ability to tie the Karate Kid kick together with the game as a whole (and the fact that he even noticed the kick in the first place) is deserving of praise. Sports fan or not, you want to read on, don’t you?

Assuming the answer is yes, you can find the full story here.