Posts tagged New York Times

Because the sender’s account had been registered anonymously, investigators had to use forensic techniques — including a check of what other e-mail accounts had been accessed from the same computer address — to identify who was writing the e-mails.

Eventually they identified Ms. Broadwell as a prime suspect and obtained access to her regular e-mail account. In its in-box, they discovered intimate and sexually explicit e-mails from another account that also was not immediately identifiable. Investigators eventually ascertained that it belonged to Mr. Petraeus and studied the possibility that someone had hacked into Mr. Petraeus’s account or was posing as him to send the explicit messages.

Eventually they determined that Mr. Petraeus had indeed sent the messages to Ms. Broadwell and concluded that the two had had an affair.

How The FBI Uncovered the Petraeus Affair 

Just so you know— your anonymous email account ain’t anonymous at all. 

(via The New York Times)

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ontheprogram:

Episode 2: David Pogue On His Proposal, Second Chances At Love

David Pogue, an award winning columnist and correspondent for outlets such as CBS and The New York Times, recently made headlines himself when he posted his recent proposal to Nikki Dugan online. The proposal, which according to Pogue has racked up over 300,000 hits, is original and touching. Pogue agreed to join On The Program for a short interview about the proposal. If you hit play, make sure to listen (or scroll ahead to) the final question, where Pogue talks about second chances at love. 

Here’s the video in case you haven’t seen it:

Here’s the second episode of my new podcast, On The Program. This week I interview New York Times personal tech columnist David Pouge about his touching movie trailer proposal. Check it out!

Born In The USA: Independence Day Thoughts
David Brooks put together a solid piece of opinion writing in the New York Times last week. The article’s first 300 words focus on a trip Brooks took to see Bruce Springsteen play on tour in Europe.  So, suffice it to say, it wasn’t your typical Times opinion piece. 
Describing the tour, Brooks mentioned a powerful scene he witnessed at a concert in Spain:

The oddest moment came midconcert when I looked across the football stadium and saw 56,000 enraptured Spaniards, pumping their fists in the air in fervent unison and bellowing at the top of their lungs, “I was born in the U.S.A.! I was born in the U.S.A.!”

"Did it occur to them at that moment," Brooks asks, "that they were not born in the U.S.A.?
At first glance, this appears pretty incredible. Just think of it: a packed stadium in Spain bellowing a patriotic American rock anthem. But “Born In The U.S.A.” is not a simple song. In an essay entitled Faith, Fandom and Bruce Springsteen, a former college professor of mine, Jeff Cowie, looks at the song in the following way: 

Few songs expose the tension between the power of the America story and its seamy underside better than Springsteen’s biggest, and most misunderstood, hit, “Born in the U.S.A.” Nearly lost in the tidal wave of sound pouring from the thundering guitars and the hoarse, grinding voice chanting the title lyric, is a quiet tale of despair. The story of a Vietnam vet searching for work and dignity amid the declining fortunes of an American dream gone awry is almost completely drowned out in the dominant chorus of patriotism.

That said, one of the beautiful things about the United States is how it can at once be loved and criticized with equal vigor. Yes, things are not perfect, but the belief is that they can be made better and, with persistence, they will.
It’s fitting then that Springsteen would embed his criticism through the lens of optimism. “Born In The U.S.A” is just that- an upbeat and joyous rock anthem with lyrics that say things aren’t great but, taken together, the overall message is that things can get better. 
I think that’s an essential attitude for any Democracy. It’s why the lyrics resonate here, and elsewhere. Just something to think of as we approach July 4th. 

Born In The USA: Independence Day Thoughts

David Brooks put together a solid piece of opinion writing in the New York Times last week. The article’s first 300 words focus on a trip Brooks took to see Bruce Springsteen play on tour in Europe.  So, suffice it to say, it wasn’t your typical Times opinion piece. 

Describing the tour, Brooks mentioned a powerful scene he witnessed at a concert in Spain:

The oddest moment came midconcert when I looked across the football stadium and saw 56,000 enraptured Spaniards, pumping their fists in the air in fervent unison and bellowing at the top of their lungs, “I was born in the U.S.A.! I was born in the U.S.A.!”

"Did it occur to them at that moment," Brooks asks, "that they were not born in the U.S.A.?

At first glance, this appears pretty incredible. Just think of it: a packed stadium in Spain bellowing a patriotic American rock anthem. But “Born In The U.S.A.” is not a simple song. In an essay entitled Faith, Fandom and Bruce Springsteen, a former college professor of mine, Jeff Cowie, looks at the song in the following way: 

Few songs expose the tension between the power of the America story and its seamy underside better than Springsteen’s biggest, and most misunderstood, hit, “Born in the U.S.A.” Nearly lost in the tidal wave of sound pouring from the thundering guitars and the hoarse, grinding voice chanting the title lyric, is a quiet tale of despair. The story of a Vietnam vet searching for work and dignity amid the declining fortunes of an American dream gone awry is almost completely drowned out in the dominant chorus of patriotism.

That said, one of the beautiful things about the United States is how it can at once be loved and criticized with equal vigor. Yes, things are not perfect, but the belief is that they can be made better and, with persistence, they will.

It’s fitting then that Springsteen would embed his criticism through the lens of optimism. “Born In The U.S.A” is just that- an upbeat and joyous rock anthem with lyrics that say things aren’t great but, taken together, the overall message is that things can get better. 

I think that’s an essential attitude for any Democracy. It’s why the lyrics resonate here, and elsewhere. Just something to think of as we approach July 4th. 

fastcompany:

Quitting Is The New Mission Statement 
“Take this job and shove it” just doesn’t cut it any more. At a time when jobs are scarce, it takes spectacular courage to quit one. Maybe that’s why we’ve seen a recent trend of people leaving their jobs with a grand flourish. Today it was now-former Goldman Sachs exec Greg Smith, who scorched the firm on his way out the door with a New York Times op-ed titled, “Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs.” Yes, the new, smart way to resign now involves grabbing some attention from would-be next employers or patrons to your new startup, all while making the ex-boss think hard about the culture or direction of his business. That probably sounds about right to Generation Flux. And that’s why quitting is the new mission statement.

Yes. Greg Smith’s op-ed is not just a ‘screw you’ to Goldman, it’s also a (very) public act of dissent taken in order to inspire change in the firm. If Smith had his way, Goldman would start operating according to the instructions laid out in his final paragraph. His mission statement:
Make the client the focal point of your business again. 
Weed out the morally bankrupt people, no matter how much money they make for the firm. 
Get the culture right again, so people want to work here for the right reasons.
Quitting has always been viewed as the ‘active’ and ‘destructive’ method to show dissent in the workplace as opposed to the ‘active’ and ‘constructive’ method: complaining.  Perhaps FastCompany is on to something here. Quitting, in some cases, can be ‘active’ and ‘constructive’ too. 
I’m sure Goldman would have preferred the complaint route, but something tells me that Smith didn’t think that option would have done much good.
Related: Why I Left Google | How to Quit a Job Without Publishing an Op-Ed

fastcompany:

Quitting Is The New Mission Statement

“Take this job and shove it” just doesn’t cut it any more. At a time when jobs are scarce, it takes spectacular courage to quit one. Maybe that’s why we’ve seen a recent trend of people leaving their jobs with a grand flourish. Today it was now-former Goldman Sachs exec Greg Smith, who scorched the firm on his way out the door with a New York Times op-ed titled, “Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs.” Yes, the new, smart way to resign now involves grabbing some attention from would-be next employers or patrons to your new startup, all while making the ex-boss think hard about the culture or direction of his business. That probably sounds about right to Generation Flux. And that’s why quitting is the new mission statement.

Yes. Greg Smith’s op-ed is not just a ‘screw you’ to Goldman, it’s also a (very) public act of dissent taken in order to inspire change in the firm. If Smith had his way, Goldman would start operating according to the instructions laid out in his final paragraph. His mission statement:

  • Make the client the focal point of your business again. 
  • Weed out the morally bankrupt people, no matter how much money they make for the firm. 
  • Get the culture right again, so people want to work here for the right reasons.

Quitting has always been viewed as the ‘active’ and ‘destructive’ method to show dissent in the workplace as opposed to the ‘active’ and ‘constructive’ method: complaining.  Perhaps FastCompany is on to something here. Quitting, in some cases, can be ‘active’ and ‘constructive’ too. 

I’m sure Goldman would have preferred the complaint route, but something tells me that Smith didn’t think that option would have done much good.

Related: Why I Left Google | How to Quit a Job Without Publishing an Op-Ed

Blogging Site Tumblr Makes Itself the News (NYTimes.com)

Tumbling for Tumblr

Brian Stelter of The New York Times reports today that Tumblr will be hiring writers and editors to “cover the world of Tumblr.” The company has already announced the hiring of two writers: Chris Mohney of BlackBook Media and Jessica Bennett of NewsBeast.

An excerpt from the story: 

Andrew McLaughlin, a vice president at Tumblr, said that in telling stories about its users, the company wanted Mr. Mohney and Ms. Bennett , the only two hires for the time being, to “do real journalism and analysis, not P.R. fluff.”

I think this should be workable due to the wealth of great content on Tumblr. It will be interesting to see how it manifests itself. 

Mohney’s Tumblr Blog: http://chrismohney.tumblr.com/

Bennett’s: http://jessbennett.tumblr.com/

Wolfson Takes On The New York Times- Twitter Style

Yesterday, the New York Times took on New York City’s Health Department over a potentially misleading ad. The ad, shown above, and portrays an obese man with an amputated leg (ostensibly due to his weight induced diabetes), and is meant to urge New Yorkers to eat less. But, as the Times points out, the man featured in the picture is not an amputee at all. His leg was amputated, reports the Times, not by a doctor but by photoshop. 

City bigwig (boy, do I love that phrase) Howard Wolfson took issue with the fact that the times felt compelled to write about this false portrayal and took to Twitter looking for a confrontation. He got one, courtesy of Times’ Metro Editor Carolyn Ryan.

I thought it would be interesting to post the Twitter spat in one place, so here it is. Do you agree with Ryan, who says the Health Department derives its power from the perception that the victims in its ads are real. Or, do you agree with Wolfson, who argues that since the correlation between sugar drinks and obesity and diabetes is a fact, it’s ok to portray it any way the City wants. 

Not an easy question, but an interesting debate if you ask me.

Being on TV implies sitting in front of a camera. That sounds contradictory to my work, which is being out somewhere, and writing, and traveling… plus, I am a child of the radio generation; I still think TV is on a tryout.

A Legend Retires

"This is a column about a column" wrote legendary New York Times sports columnist George Vecsey in his farewell to the paper this December. The column, a retrospective looking back at Vecsey’s career and favorite stories, is touching and well written. A subsequent Q&A with blogger Bill Lucey is equally worthwhile.

In the Q&A, Vecsey opens up about how the 24 hour news cycle influences his work: ”Somebody always wants your copy for the Web. So you rush,” and doles out advice to aspring young journalists: ”Seriously? Minor in something else.”

I particularly like the quote above which is a response to a question asking why he’s done very few television interviews. “I would quickly add” says Vecsey, “that I have had a mild case of stage fright.”

Read the full interview on Lucey’s blog.

Thanks go out to Poynter and Jim Romenesko for pointing me to the Q&A.

Dreams into Reality
Sports Meetup is a new group I’ve started with the aim of bringing sports fans together with members of the industry. This was a pipe dream just a few months ago, but I’ve finally decided to suck it up and go for it. The group is 57 members strong and had its first meetup a few weeks ago with Mark Viera, a freelance writer who covers the New York Football Giants for the New York Times. 
The event brought me back to my radio days where I would book interview guests with amazing stories to tell. Mark certainly brought his fair share and told over wonderful short stories about the Francisco Rodriguez punching-the-father-in-law debacle and about Mike Schmidt, a writer for the New York Times who began as a clerk and was told he would never get to write for the paper. Little did they know.
Mike, unable to accept irrelevance, became the best clerk the Times had ever seen. He knew how each writer took their coffee and collated their papers. When Mike got his big break, a test assignment to cover Mike Vick’s dog fighting abuses, he nailed it. The story was so good, and the connections he made so strong, that he went on to become the top reporter covering the MLB steroids scandal. Mike is now in Baghdad in a coveted war correspondant role. Heck, some dreams do become reality. 
When 16 people and a writer for the New York Times turn out to a untested meetup group’s first event, you know there has to be something good going on. That’s the hope at least. Once a month, I’ll be organizing a sports meetup and hosting new guests each time. In June, Andrew Finger, a producer at CBS Sports will give the group a look behind the scenes at CBS. If the first event was any indicator, this will be one you don’t want to miss. Sign up for the group today to learn more: meetup.com/sportsmeetupny

Dreams into Reality

Sports Meetup is a new group I’ve started with the aim of bringing sports fans together with members of the industry. This was a pipe dream just a few months ago, but I’ve finally decided to suck it up and go for it. The group is 57 members strong and had its first meetup a few weeks ago with Mark Viera, a freelance writer who covers the New York Football Giants for the New York Times. 

The event brought me back to my radio days where I would book interview guests with amazing stories to tell. Mark certainly brought his fair share and told over wonderful short stories about the Francisco Rodriguez punching-the-father-in-law debacle and about Mike Schmidt, a writer for the New York Times who began as a clerk and was told he would never get to write for the paper. Little did they know.

Mike, unable to accept irrelevance, became the best clerk the Times had ever seen. He knew how each writer took their coffee and collated their papers. When Mike got his big break, a test assignment to cover Mike Vick’s dog fighting abuses, he nailed it. The story was so good, and the connections he made so strong, that he went on to become the top reporter covering the MLB steroids scandal. Mike is now in Baghdad in a coveted war correspondant role. Heck, some dreams do become reality. 

When 16 people and a writer for the New York Times turn out to a untested meetup group’s first event, you know there has to be something good going on. That’s the hope at least. Once a month, I’ll be organizing a sports meetup and hosting new guests each time. In June, Andrew Finger, a producer at CBS Sports will give the group a look behind the scenes at CBS. If the first event was any indicator, this will be one you don’t want to miss. Sign up for the group today to learn more: meetup.com/sportsmeetupny